intentions


‘Don’t you know? When you refused to help one of the least important among these my little ones, my true brothers and sisters, you refused to help and honor me.’ [Matthew 25:45 TPT]


The way we treat people is so important to God.
When we shut up compassion in our hearts we experience consequences.
It does beg the question of why some let compassion flow freely while others damn it up?

To answer I give you two Greek words that speak a bit to the human condition:
  • hamartanĊ :: to miss the mark (and so not share in the prize), to err, especially (morally) to sin. [see Romans 3:23 for context] 
  • parabasis :: violation, breaking, transgression. [see Romans 4:15 for context]
These two words represent two aspects of a phenomenon that the bible describes as sin.

The first (hamartanĊ) is one that is somewhat representative of our human nature.
It speaks to the idea that people who have good intentions often make mistakes and err in judgment.
The second word (parabasis) speaks of people with bad intentions who seek to do harm.

And it is sometimes difficult to differentiate between the two.

I believe that Jesus, in this passage, speaks to those who live lives of bad intentions.
Folks who have suppressed compassion in their hearts for so long.
These no longer understand what it means to be truly human.

These are those who do not simply miss the mark.
Jesus' words condemn them as he speaks about their hard and selfish hearts.
Hearts that reject pleas for food, clothing and compassion.

To these he speaks words of rebuke.

Help me Lord to remember how you suffer with the poor, the sick and imprisoned.


... this devotion is part of the Red Letters series. Click here to read more.

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